Number Nine Miner
In memory of all the hard working coal miners
who were called to rest in #9 mine disaster

Number Niner Miner:-by Steve O.-

A cold sad November day it will be the men of mine number nine who dig coal for a fee

Deep underground a shift of working men motoring with maps unfold

Some young, some old 99 a toll each section working this seam of black gold

Dangers of mining mother earth came up from the near past

With 1954 fresh in mind many thought it would be the last

Dig Dig number niner miner dig for that coal working hard in a deep dark hole

Start time each section every man knows his task different jobs but wore the same black mask

Each man a job well done machines power up electric motor hum

Belt line rolling loaded up cars are hauling by the ton

Mountaineers they are passed on from Father to son dust in the lungs mining in the blood

As loud as thunder What Was That??  A great wall of black up under took shaft

Where once stood leaving behind only a single light and miners hat

Dig Dig number niner miner dig for that coal working hard in a deep dark hole

Skill and lady luck 21 made it out with life on topside the waiting of miners, children and wife

Wednesday November 20, 1968 World news was made to date mine number nine took 78

Aground day into next mine officials A good word not to say

Family's and friends gather not far away a small church for news and pray

Dig Dig number niner miner dig for that coal You did your job now it's time to come home

After seal and mine close 19 good men will never leave the coal

God Bless each and every soul now Rest in Peace boys in the deep dark hole.


In memory of all the hard working coal miners
who were called to rest in #9 mine disaster
1954, 1968

©Steve Opyoke
03-0-20-2010
Used With Permission Of Author
All Rights Reserved





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Falls of ground remain the greatest single hazard faced by underground miners. They cause nearly 50% of fatal injuries. When coal is first mined, large pillars of coal are left to support the rock between the mine and surface.  When these pillars are later recovered, the ground collapses. Nationally, coal pillar recovery accounts for just 10% of coal mined underground, but it is linked to more than 30% of roof falls.